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Thread: Ripping up a manufacturing line.

  1. #1

    Ripping up a manufacturing line.

    Suppose you are plant manager in an automotive organization. In your plant V1 V2, V3 three cars are manufactured and now you have to ramp down the one and increase production of another vehicle in what area of organization you will make change and how would it affect production?

  2. #2
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    Ripping up a manufacturing line

    I would like to preface the list below with the comment that ideally, this list of risks would be done by a cross-functional team getting the appropriate and various perspectives on the situation to uncover the range of difficulties with this endeavor. In this event, we are ramping down one line and bringing to closure while ramping up another line – that is increasing the present volume of output of product.


    Operationally (purchasing, product, supplier, and industrial engineering)

    • Overage or worse shortage of material due to errant projections for the ramping down line (waste or inability to produce products from the ramp down line prematurely)
    • Limits on the capability of EDI and incoming material for production (supplier and purchasing interface)
    • Material ordering and supplier’s ability to respond relatively quickly as we learn how much of what parts are needed
    • Ability of the second line to meet the new volume and quality challenges
    • Old material contractual or obligated volumes from the supplier
    • Maintaining quality of the ramping down line
    • Transitioning people from the one line to the other – training in the new line components and processes
    • Lack of consideration for testing of the increased volume line as it is undergoing a “small” incremental line update
    • Relationship with the suppliers for the outgoing product – contractual
    • Does the existing line need to be extended or volume from this line increased?




    Project management

    • Cost and schedule challenges especially if the outgoing customer ordering is inconsistent
    • Scope changes that come with many projects – poor control almost certainly means over cost and late
    • Insufficient available or volume of talent to take on the project – but take the project on anyway
    • Inadequate sponsor involvement to pursue to timely resolution
    • Other priority projects stealing resources from this project
    • Coordinating ramping down of one line with the work of ramping up


    Engineering
    • Are new tools or work instructions required for this increased volume on the second line?
    • What does the aftermarket support for the discontinued product resemble?
    • Is the present control plan sufficient for this new volume of production? What about the PFMEA, and MSA? Gauge R&R?

  3. #3
    Above information is very helpful for me to understand the ramp down concept and related problem
    what would you advise to reduce complexity during ramp down

    thank you for your time

  4. #4
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    Sponsor, Supplier, and Execution

    Talk with the sponsor for this project, what is their ultimate objective. What measurements will let you know if you are on target for that objective? Figure out with your team how and who shall make those measurements.

    The supplier portion of this, that is any contractual agreements regarding volume of product per year must be thought about. Check to see if the projected phase out material meets any volume per year requirement from the supplier. If there is a volume per year target, and you will not hit this target due to ramp down, you can expect supply problems at worst case, and perhaps a material cost increase at best.

    I would explore the capability of the line that is to increase in volume, to see if it will handle this new increased volume and deliver the quality expected. This will likely require discussions with those that made the line to start with. The discussion should any changes required or if the existing set up will meet the demand. This will include the talent available for that line and increase production.

    Then I would sit down with my team, show them the scope of the work, develop specific actions and discuss the things they see as risks. Your team will likely have some representation that includes the following:
    1. Manufacturing engineering
    2. Purchasing and material handling
    3. Quality



    Develop a schedule, create a list of risks – and prioritize the ones that will be the most damaging should they come to pass.

    Does this help?

    Jon

  5. #5
    hello sir,

    It helps me very much...

    thank you

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