To get better at something requires practice, learning, adapting and application. Testing the product does not go away because of simulation, but we are able to learn earlier via simulation. Prototype product developing may take some time, though in many cases rapid prototyping can shorten this time. Complex systems may not be so easily constructed via rapid prototyping. To get better at simulation we must start doing the work and learning. That requires taking advantage of opportunities to learn.

  1. We can extend of our simulation capability via the experience
  2. Expand the repertoire of models that represent the product (getting more model parameters).
  3. Simulation can allow for multiple scenarios to play through, that includes environmental as well as product variations.
  4. We do not have to wait in the testing queue to begin to understand more quickly the capability of the present design to accomplish the defrost requirements (not to exclude the risks you note below). For example, if we fail horribly we likely have a problem, if simulations indicate we are perhaps close, then maybe we will be okay.


Getting better at simulations will help future development, but to get that benefit requires learning along the way. This is not only learning about the product, but learning how to perform the simulations.